“Never meet with strangers from the Internet”

When I grew up I was told by my parents to “never meet with strangers from the Internet” and “never get into a stranger’s car”. These weren’t just silly rules that my parents set out for me, but rational perception that society at large lived by. But today, I break these rules on a weekly basis when getting Uber rides.

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What’s happened to cryptocurrencies?

Over the past ~1.5 years I’ve been blogging on and off about cryptocurrencies, blockchains and other related topics. The most popular pieces of content on my blog have been my entire series about How to Build Dapps on Ethereum series and a post about fungibility, dating back to the spring of 2017. A lot has happened since then in the Wild West of crypto. So here’s a brief run-down.

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Blockchain projects and dapps that already provide utility

This is a short post to highlight some blockchain projects that are live and providing some sort of actual utility for general users. I’m not going to include projects that provide financial exchange utility, such as payment, trading etc. There are plenty of those projects, but they aren’t useful for the general user.

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Two balls and the colour-blind friend

Zero-knowledge proof cryptography is something that I have lots of interest in. It’s a type of cryptography that allow a prover to prove to a verifier that a certain statement is true, without revealing anything else apart from that statement. ZK-SNARKS, a variant of zero-knowledge proofs, is being built into Ethereum (it already exists in zCash). In this blog post I’ll refer to a very simple story that explain how zero-knowledge proofs work. Continue reading “Two balls and the colour-blind friend”

Building dapps on Ethereum – part 6: deploying a private testnet

When developing dapps and smart contracts, it’s of great importance to have a good development workflow and to go through the right amount of testing and validation. In previous posts I’ve explained how to setup a local blockchain node for testing. While the ultimate goal is to deploy your dapp to one of Ethereum’s test networks, and then the main network, it’s very useful to be able to run your own full private network. This can be used for internal testing, verification and simulation, within your own team or company. In this blog post we’ll cover just that — how to deploy a private testnet and the basic components involved. Continue reading “Building dapps on Ethereum – part 6: deploying a private testnet”