Non-technical explanation of encryption and digital signatures

Having a basic understanding of encryption and digital signatures has become important as history has repeatedly taught us that we can’t trust everyone on the Internet (e.g. Internet service providers, email services etc.). This blog post will try to explain in a non-technical way how encryption and digital signatures work and why something called “private keys” are important to keep secret! Continue reading “Non-technical explanation of encryption and digital signatures”

Brave – my new web browser

I have for the longest of times been a Firefox user. I love what Mozilla, the foundation behind Firefox, has done to bring more freedom, transparency, privacy and security to the web. But there’s a lot more work to be done because online monetization is centered around tracking user behavior by compromising on users’ privacy and security with methods like browser fingerprinting, third-party cookies and malicious online advertisements. And yet, no web browser out-of-the-box do a good job of protecting the user against these things, special plug-ins or configuration is needed which is a barrier for many people. And yet, the fundamental problem is still not solved, i.e. limited options for publishers to monetizing their content. Continue reading “Brave – my new web browser”

What is Vault 7? And how not to be spied on

Have you heard about the latest Wikileaks release called Vault 7?

The short version: If you ever were sceptic about “USA is spying on everyone on the Internet” you can stop being sceptic now… Since 7 March we know, for a fact, that they’re capable of hacking into, listening and recording on pretty much any server and any private device with an Internet connection. It’s actually real. Continue reading “What is Vault 7? And how not to be spied on”

Why I do free software

Free software is software that respects users’ freedom and the community around them. Users of such software are able to use, copy, distribute, study, change or improve the software. “Free” in this case refers to the freedom, not the price, of the software. “Free software” does not mean “non-commercial”. A free program must be available for commercial use and it can cost money. In fact, commercial free software is a very important part of the ecosystem.

Many things in life are “free” in this sense (remember we are not talking about the price). Concrete things like furniture and cars or more abstract things like scientific research all have the aforementioned freedoms. You can use, copy (if you have the tools), distribute, study, change or improve these things as you like. Would you ever buy a table that you’re not allowed to re-paint? Or buy a car you’re not allowed to change tires on? I don’t think you would.

Continue reading “Why I do free software”