Bitcoin is not money

It’s sometimes hard to frame conversations around cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin and Ether. That’s largely down to the fact that no one can truly express what these things are, and what they mean to humans and our society. These are entirely new organisms that lack precedence. But finding the right definitions are going to be important because it will ultimately decide if and/or how governments will regulate these things. Is Bitcoin money? Is Bitcoin a network or a protocol? Is Bitcoin a community? It’s none of the above and all of them at the same time. Continue reading “Bitcoin is not money”

Padlock – my new password manager

Up until a few weeks ago I never used tools like password managers or digital keychains to keep track of my passwords, recovery codes etc. I’ve had a system in my head for each service and password where I consistently could (kind of) encrypt each password into a 16 character long string. All passwords were unique for private as well as work. However, it’s become harder and harder to maintain this system and keep track of everything. It’s also been a bit inconsistent because I’ve had to keep things such as two-factor authentication recovery codes on an encrypted external hard drive which isn’t easy to access when I need it. I needed a better system. Continue reading “Padlock – my new password manager”

Why I do free software

Free software is software that respects users’ freedom and the community around them. Users of such software are able to use, copy, distribute, study, change or improve the software. “Free” in this case refers to the freedom, not the price, of the software. “Free software” does not mean “non-commercial”. A free program must be available for commercial use and it can cost money. In fact, commercial free software is a very important part of the ecosystem.

Many things in life are “free” in this sense (remember we are not talking about the price). Concrete things like furniture and cars or more abstract things like scientific research all have the aforementioned freedoms. You can use, copy (if you have the tools), distribute, study, change or improve these things as you like. Would you ever buy a table that you’re not allowed to re-paint? Or buy a car you’re not allowed to change tires on? I don’t think you would.

Continue reading “Why I do free software”